EEML: Extended Environments Markup Language

v.1.01 (November 2008)

For more information about EEML (Extended Environments Markup Language), see eeml.org.

The EEML library for Processing makes use of Extended Environments Markup Language to share real time data between remote environments, both physical and virtual.

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eeml  

 

v.1.01 (November 2008)

For more information about EEML (Extended Environments Markup Language), see eeml.org.

The EEML library for Processing makes use of Extended Environments Markup Language to share real time data between remote environments, both physical and virtual. It is used in particular for connecting to the main repository of environment/sensor data feeds located at www.pachube.com.

Using the EEML library enables you to share real time data (e.g. sensor data, variable values) from your processing applets with others across a network. By routing via www.pachube.com this data will be made available to the public so that they can connect to and make use of real time data from your applet. Similarly you can use the EEML library to connect to remote feeds via the www.pachube.com website without requiring pre-existing protocol agreements.

The two main objects to use are DataIn and DataOut. They are asynchronous, meaning that at the most basic level, you simply need to create the objects in your setup loop and then make sure to have the callback functions as listed in the documentation. Then any time an object needs to (i.e. when a DataOut object receives a request for data; or a DataIn receives data back from its automatic requests) the callback function is called and variables can be updated. In effect you should not normally need use of the objects in the draw() loop.

As of release 1.0, there is now also a version of the DataOut object that allows for manual updates of EEML data, so that Pachube feeds can be updated by clients behind firewalls, or clients that don't have a fixed URL.

This library makes use of the existing processing net library.

XML parsing is based on proXML by Christian Riekoff (see http://www.texone.org/proxml/ for more info). Thank you!